HTC EVO 4G Review


The boys at Engadget have just posted the first HTC EVO 4G review today. How did the Android version of the HTC HD2 turn out to be?  Nothing really surprising actually. If you have ever used an HTC HD2 and HTC Desire (or better yet an HTC Incredible which has the same camera as the EVO 4G) then just image a mix of both and you get the EVO 4G. Besides the 8Mpix camera,the 4G Radio and HDMI output the EVO 4G has exactly the same hardware specifications as the HTC HD2 (you should be aware that one handed usability isn’t going to be awesome given the size of the device). Android 2.1 is IMO the only relevant differentiator here, check out the 18 minutes long video below:

Here’s there conclusion:

Let us be crystal clear: we love this phone. Nay, we adore it. But the fact remains that it’s still very much an Android device — which means that if you don’t like Android now, odds are good that even Android executed on the most amazing hardware to date won’t do much to change your opinion of it. You’ve also got to be concerned about upgradeability; Froyo is almost certainly around the corner now, and HTC hasn’t done anything to suggest it’s able to push Sense-powered updates in a timely fashion.

That said, this is truly one of the best smartphones ever made, and even spotty 4G — a reality of a young technology that’s going to take years to properly build out — probably won’t do much to hamper your enjoyment of this thing. It’s reasonable to assume that phones like the EVO will ultimately come to every carrier over the next few months… but hey, if you jumped ship for Sprint to pick up this monster, we wouldn’t be able blame you.

We will hopefully see other reviews with a more in-depth analysis of the camera and 720P recoding and playback capabilities of the handset soon. It would also be really be interesting to see how the HTC EVO 4G’s 1500Mah battery stacks up against the 1230Mah battery in the HTC HD2. Android seems to suffer from really poor power management compared to other mobile OS (I had a similar issues with the HTC Desire).

UPDATE: More impressions here

Source: Engadget

  • John Martens

    I was reading about the battery consumption being caused by some of the apps in the market because of the code not being correctly written to handle the power issues.
    I love my G1 and my battery can last for quite a while. I don’t leave my GPS, wifi and bluetooth on all the time either. Lower the brightness a bit and it really helps out a lot.

    I am thinking about jumping over to Sprint for the EVO, as TMobile decided to go the Window OS route….pretty sad.

    Just my $0.02

  • John Martens

    I was reading about the battery consumption being caused by some of the apps in the market because of the code not being correctly written to handle the power issues.
    I love my G1 and my battery can last for quite a while. I don’t leave my GPS, wifi and bluetooth on all the time either. Lower the brightness a bit and it really helps out a lot.

    I am thinking about jumping over to Sprint for the EVO, as TMobile decided to go the Window OS route….pretty sad.

    Just my $0.02

  • http://www.mobiletechworld.com/tips-contact/ M. Daou

    Yeah Google claims that some apps are causing the battery comsumption problems. But this isn’t good answer/reason especially when there flagship phone (Nexus One) exhibits this issue out of the box. I have used the HTC Desire alongside the HD2 for 10 days and noticed that there’s definitenaly some power managment issues as it it not normal that a device with bigger screen and an LCD panel that requires more power (the AMOLED screens are less power hungry) and a smaller battery can last 50% longer(with same usage and services running).

  • http://www.mobiletechworld.com/tips-contact/ M. Daou

    Yeah Google claims that some apps are causing the battery comsumption problems. But this isn’t good answer/reason especially when there flagship phone (Nexus One) exhibits this issue out of the box. I have used the HTC Desire alongside the HD2 for 10 days and noticed that there’s definitenaly some power managment issues as it it not normal that a device with bigger screen and an LCD panel that requires more power (the AMOLED screens are less power hungry) and a smaller battery can last 50% longer(with same usage and services running).