Cypress demonstrates touchless capability of their TrueTouch capcitive panel

Here’s another video from Cypress Technologythis time demonstrating the new Hover finger tracking capabilities of their TrueTouch capacitive touch panel. I’m not sure how useful this can be but I think I may have experience this so called “feature” on my HTC HD2 already. AFAIK (according to what I have heard during MWC10, not 100% sure though) the HD2 has a Cypress touchpanel and the damn thing is so sensitive that it can work through clothes! Yes put the HD2 in your pocket with the screen facing your leg and without shutting it down, you can bet that you’ll be calling contacts, opening apps without even touching the device.

Cypress’s New Hover Detection for TrueTouch™ Touchscreen Solution Indicates Where a Finger Will Touch as It Approaches Screen
SAN JOSE, Calif., April 21, 2010 – Cypress Semiconductor Corp. (Nasdaq: CY) today announced support for hover detection for its capacitive touchscreen technology. The new feature, driven by Cypress’s TrueTouch™, enables smart touchscreen solutions that anticipate the touch of a finger and enlarge content such as points on a map or the font of tiny website links to make them easier to find and select. Hover detection changes the fundamental navigation functions on mobile devices by emulating “mouseover,” a feature well known in the personal computer segment for web navigation. The feature delivers easier, more accurate interface navigation for handsets, GPS systems and other mobile applications.

A video demonstration of the hover feature is available at www.cypress.com/go/hovervideo. The video includes footage of a TrueTouch touchscreen recognizing a user’s finger as it approaches the touch sensor before the finger touches. A corresponding circle on the screen changes size to demonstrate how the application detects the user’s finger as it hovers above the screen.

“Mobile phone manufacturers are looking for ways to differentiate their products, and features such as hover support and stylus recognition enable them to do just that,” said Dhwani Vyas, vice president of the User Interface Business Unit at Cypress. “Delivering a mouseover-like capability to the mobile phone space shows that Cypress continues to focus on creative features aligned with market demand. With so much emphasis on web content to the mobile handset, innovative navigation techniques are necessary to bring a familiar web-browsing experience to the user. Our customers are excited about TrueTouch because its flexible architecture enables them to continuously create and deliver value-added features.”

Cypress recently announced highly accurate passive stylus support for a tip as thin as 1 mm, allowing users additional levels of accuracy and control for text entry, keyboard, handwriting recognition and other productive functions for mobile applications. A video of Cypress’s stylus support is available at www.cypress.com/go/stylusvideo.

Cypress’s TrueTouch family includes single-touch, multitouch gesture and multitouch all-point offerings. Cypress was the first company to introduce multitouch all-point functionality, which can track an unlimited number of touches. This capability enables designers to create new usage models for products such as mobile handsets, portable media players (PMPs), GPS systems and other products, and has been in mass production since 2008. TrueTouch is the industry’s most flexible touchscreen architecture, which allows designers to implement differentiated features and make last-minute design iterations without board changes.

Cypress’s high performance TMA300 multitouch all-point family provides best-in-class scan times for true multifinger touch and superior signal-to-noise ratio for the most demanding touchscreen applications. Additional information about the TrueTouch solution is available at www.cypress.com/go/TrueTouch.

The flexible TrueTouch solution allows customers to rapidly develop leading-edge solutions without having to buy turnkey modules. They have a choice of using touch sensors (glass or film) and LCDs from preferred partners, and can develop innovative mechanical designs ranging from flat to curved surfaces of varying thickness. In addition, TrueTouch devices offer Cypress’s legendary noise immunity with patented capacitive sensing technology that enables flawless operation in noisy RF and LCD environments.

Availability
Cypress is currently working with lead customers on hover support for the TrueTouch touchscreen solution. A hover support module is expected to be broadly available in the second quarter of 2010.

Source: Cypress Thanks Kal9El

Cypress demonstrates 1mm-Stylus support on TrueTouch capacitive screens

Wow, looks like Cypress Technology has finally made possible what everybody has been dreaming of: Native support for thin styluses on a capacitive touchscreen. As you can see in the video, TrueTouch support stylus input from a stylus as thin as 1mm made of any conductive material. It would be interesting to see what Microsoft‘s decides to do in the future with Windows Phone 7 given that the new OS now natively supports Cypress TrueTouch panels. Hopefully OEMs will choose this technology on their phones so developers will start building apps/games that support stylus input. This can also be a blessing for Enterprise users who require stylus-input in their applications.

Cypress Introduces High-Precision Stylus Support Accurate to 1 mm for Capacitive Touchscreen Mobile Handset Market
SAN JOSE, Calif., February 15, 2010 – Cypress Semiconductor Corp. (NASDAQ: CY) today announced highly accurate passive stylus support for capacitive touchscreen technology. With a 1-mm accurate tip, Cypress’s TrueTouch™ touchscreen solution is poised to transform the stylus market for the next generation of capacitive touchscreen phones, allowing users additional levels of accuracy and control for text entry, keyboard, handwriting recognition and other productive functions for mobile applications. For example, stylus accuracy enables users to enter complex Asian characters and to point to ever-smaller icons used in today’s mobile phone user interfaces.

A video of Cypress’s stylus support is available at www.cypress.com/go/stylusvideo. The video includes footage of a TrueTouch touchscreen accurately tracking a signature written with just a standard No. 2 pencil. Cypress is demonstrating the new stylus capability for touchscreens, as well as peripheral and mass storage controllers and precision motion sensing technology for handsets, at the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona from February 15-18 in Hall 1, Booth 1F53.

Stylus support has been traditionally limited to resistive touchscreens, which require the user to apply pressure on a multilayer screen. This type of screen is vulnerable to scratches and exhibits poor visibility in sunlight. As a result, many mobile device manufacturers have moved to capacitive touchscreen technology. One limitation to further adoption of capacitive touchscreens however has been the lack of stylus support or, at best, having to use a large 3- to 4-mm stylus designed for large icon selection. Cypress’s highly accurate passive stylus solution makes it even more compelling for end customers to adopt capacitive touchscreens.

“The unprecedented level of accuracy of our stylus support will enable us to transform a broad range of markets,” said Dhwani Vyas, vice president of the User Interface Business Unit at Cypress. “Watching the video, you can clearly see the system level performance our TrueTouch technology delivers. TrueTouch combines the best of both worlds: 1 mm stylus support accurate enough to draw detailed characters, such as in traditional Chinese, along with the multitouch capability, transparency, scratch-resistance and all-around durability of capacitive touchscreens. I’m proud of the technical achievement of our team, and think many potential customers will be excited about this new capability.”

Cypress’s TrueTouch family includes single-touch, multitouch gesture and multitouch all-point offerings. Cypress was the first company to introduce multitouch all-point functionality, which can track an unlimited number of touches. This capability enables designers to create new usage models for products such as mobile handsets, portable media players (PMPs), GPS systems and other products, and has been in mass production since 2008. TrueTouch is the industry’s most flexible touchscreen architecture, which allows designers to implement differentiated features and make last-minute design iterations without board changes.

Cypress recently announced its next-generation high performance TMA300 multitouch all-point family. This controller provides best-in-class scan times for true multifinger touch and superior signal-to-noise ratio for the most demanding touchscreen applications. Additional information about the TrueTouch solution is available at www.cypress.com/go/TrueTouch.

The flexible TrueTouch solution allows customers to rapidly develop leading-edge solutions without having to buy turnkey modules. They have a choice of using touch sensors (glass or film) and LCDs from preferred partners, and can develop innovative mechanical designs ranging from flat to curved surfaces of varying thickness. In addition, TrueTouch devices offer Cypress’s legendary noise immunity with patented capacitive sensing technology that enables flawless operation in noisy RF and LCD environments.

Availability
Cypress is currently working with lead customers on stylus support for the TrueTouch touchscreen solution. A stylus support module is expected to be broadly available in the second quarter of 2010.

Source: Cypress Thanks for the tip Kal9El

Cypress announces Windows Phone 7 native support for TrueTouch capacitive touchscreens


Cypress Technology yesterday announced that their TrueTouch capacitive touch panel is now natively supported in Windows Phone 7:

Cypress Announces That Windows® Phone 7 Series Includes Native Support for TrueTouch™ Touchscreen Solution
SAN JOSE, Calif., April 22, 2010 – Cypress Semiconductor Corp. (Nasdaq: CY) today announced that the TrueTouch™ touchscreen solution is natively supported in the soon to be released Windows® Phone 7 Series mobile handset platform. This support allows handset manufacturers using the Windows Phone 7 Series to implement exciting capacitive touchscreen interfaces without the need for developing external drivers or custom software development.

Announced in February, Windows Phone 7 Series offers a fresh approach to phone software, distinguished by smart design and truly integrated user experiences. It takes a fundamentally different approach to phone design, with dynamically updated “live tiles” that show users real-time content directly. It also includes “hubs” that bring together related content from the web, applications and services into a single view to simplify common tasks such as reading, editing and sharing documents all in one place.

“Cypress is proud to see the TrueTouch solution selected for native support within this exciting new platform,” said Dhwani Vyas, vice president of the User Interface Business Unit at Cypress. “Of the many touchscreen products available, none offers the advanced features and flexibility of TrueTouch. The interface within Windows Phone 7 Series enables manufacturers to take advantage of these attributes quickly and seamlessly. This software support, coupled with our broad family of devices, is going to significantly reduce time-to-market for the next generation of capacitive-touch-enabled Windows Phone 7 Series phones.”

Cypress recently announced its next-generation high performance TMA300 multi-touch all-point family. This controller provides best-in-class scan times for true multi-finger touch and superior signal-to-noise ratio for the most demanding touchscreen applications. Cypress has also recently demonstrated advanced functions such as 1 mm stylus and large touchscreen support. Additional information about the TrueTouch solution is available at www.cypress.com/go/TrueTouch.

The flexible TrueTouch solution allows customers to rapidly develop leading-edge solutions without having to buy turnkey modules. They have a choice of using touch sensors (glass or film) and LCDs from preferred partners, and can develop innovative mechanical designs ranging from flat to curved surfaces of varying thickness. In addition, TrueTouch devices offer Cypress’s legendary noise immunity with patented capacitive sensing technology that enables flawless operation in noisy RF and LCD environments.

Source: Cypress

Will the HTC Capacitive Stylus be a rebranded Dagi Stylus?

htc-capacitive-stylus
The Russian boys at YouHTC.ru just sent me this picture of what seems like a rebranded Dagi capacitive stylus (se it in action on an HTC HD2here). Now I don’t know if this is real or a Photoshop job (looks like Shop to me). So let’s just wait and see.

Source: YouHTC.ru

Official HTC Capacitive stylus coming soon

HTC HD2 capacitive stylus
Well it looks like HTC is about to launch a capacitive compatible stylus soon. According to UK online retailer CLOVE:

Have you been struggling to get to grips with the HTC HD2′s capacitive touch screen? Been screaming out for a stylus that will allow you to select items and navigate the screen with more ease?

Worry no more. This official stylus from HTC is designed specifically to work with the capacitive touch screen of the HTC HD2. Using the latest technology the stylus will allow you to better use your HD2. No more fingers or thumbs!

Can the HTC-STYHD2 be the one they’ve patented a while ago ? Pice, specification & availibility are not know yet

Source: Clove thanks for the tip Mikos!

Capacitive stylus hands-on with the HTC HD2

Here’s a video demonstrating two capacitive-compatible stylus being used on the HTC HD2. The first being the Teno Pogo Sketch and Dagi Transparent Stylus.

Even-though they seems to work well, I’m not sure if theyr are really of any use given the size of their tip. Hopefully HTC will launch their own capacitive compatible stylus one day…

Source: YouTube via WMPoweruser

Microsoft Courier UI slides leaked


Gizmodo has posted one more Microsoft Courier leak today. This time it’s the presentation slides describing how the Courier’s UI works. The document shows the different gestures used to interact with the devices. I’m willing to bet that Microsoft isn’t happy about all these leaks..See the previous leaks here & here.

Source: Gizmodo

Latest HTC TouchFLO/Sense has iPhone-like copy & paste

WooO looks like Apple fans are going to have a field day with this one. The way copy/paste is managed in the latest version of HTC‘s TouchFLO/Sense UI for the HTC HD2 is exactly the same as on the iPhone (minus the magifying glass). This can only be a good thing though given that Apple’s implementation is one ofthe best I’ve ever used. Wonder what happened to to the HTCMagnifier though, I guess that if will be availble once the new version of Windows Mobile 6.5 is released.

HTCmagnifier

Source: Pocketnow

Don’t worry you won’t ever need a stylus on the HTC HD2

 

Many people have been worried about the lack of stylus support on the HTC HD2 / Leo because of the capacitive touchscreen. Well fear no more because HTC anticipated this and tweaked the basic Windows Mobile 6.5 UI in the same way Microsoft is doing it as we have seen in the latest builds that have been leaked (see here). As you can see in the video above, check boxes now have a slightly bigger size to accommodate your finger and the scroll-bar gets thicker once you touch it.

Source: PDA.pl via WMPoweruser

Maemo 6 UI information & N900 hands-on videos


UMPCPortal grabed some pictures of Nokia‘s Maemo keynote during the Maemo summit today. So far we now have conformation that Maemo 6 will have native support for capacitive touch panel and multi-touch support. What doesn’t change is the TI OMA3 chipset support, OpenGL ES and WVGA screen resolution. The next version will also have portrait mode unlike Maemo 5 which only support landscape. Maemo 6 ins’t expected until late 2010 and I can’t wait to see what Nokia is cooking as the successor to the N900. Windows Mobile 7 vs Maemo 6!

Here are also two Nokia N900 hands-on vidoes showing the device in action (some OGL ES 2 demo, flash in the browser etc..):

Source: UMPCPortal

More Microsoft Courier details and speculations

500x_courierui
Gizmodo just posted some new info they’ve got about Microsoft’s booklet/tablet prototype the Courier. They’ve posted a second video showing the Courier being used as a journal/scrapbook.

The heart of Courier appears to what’s called the “infinite journal,” which is what it sounds like: A journal/scrapbook that is endless, bound only by storage constraints (presumably). Hopefully they will call it something less awkward. The journal can actually be published online, and it’s shown here as able to be downloaded in three formats: a Courier file, Powerpoint or PDF. There’s also a library that looks a lot like Delicious Library, where things like subscriptions, notebooks and apps, are stored.

The video demonstrates the abilitiy ot cut/copy/pastefrom any part of a webpage in the browser and drag it to the second screen/page which acts are your scrapbook. This functionalilty is already availalbe in InkSeine but in a less polished way. Another nice feature is the ability to share your presentations/scrapbooks with anyboy via the internet.

It feels more evolved and fined, and less convoluted, suggesting it’s more recent.

Uh? The first video was basically a polished demo of InkSeine (which has been available for more than a year) while the second video is all about using the tablet as a scrapbook. I don’t see how this means that the Courier is only a scrapbook tablet now. So If I make a 2mins video demoing Excel on a PC it would instantly mean that a PC is only used to create spreadsheets? Nice logic boys.

According someone who tipped Mary Jo Foley, the courier prototype is supposedly running Windows 7. I would bet on some form of Windows CE 7/WM7 though. Her tipster is also saying that Microsoft is going to biuld the device and attempting to launch it in Mid-2010. Wait & see..

Source: Gizmodo & MJF

Microsoft’s Courier Tablet details!

courier8 (Small)

What the…Gizmodo just posted a whole bunch of info (and video) of Microsoft’s internal Tablet prototype named Courier. It’s said to have dual folding 7inch capacitive touch-screens that can be operated by fingers or stylus for handwriting recognition and a 3mpx camera with flah on the back. It still remains to be seen if this device is ever going to hit retail but it looks mighty impressive so far. It looks like part of the UI uses Microsoft’s Research Inkseine. I wonder which OS is this device going to run. Is it a version of Windows CE 7? Windows Mobile 7? J. Allard Chief Experience Officer is working on it. The PMX division is also working on Pink and WM7

Here’s a little memory refresher: Microsoft Codex dual screen prototype Looks similar ? Yes, it even uses InkSeine as the main UI.

[flv:http://blip.tv/file/get/IMav-MicrosoftTabletPrototype258.flv 480 360]

codex-book-posture

500x_courier1_01 Source: Gizmodo

HTC Leo shown on video, Multi-Touch capacitive screen in action

That’s right folks. The first ever Windows Mobile Smartphone with a capacitive screen is the HTC Leo running WM 6.5. Check out the video showing the pinch gesture to zoom-in/out in the HTC album app. The lucky boys at PocketPT.net are saying that multi-touch is working in the browser, picture/video aaplication ans Maps.

Source: PocketPT via WMPoweruser

HTC Leo Pictured for the first time! Specs confirmed

That’s right, HTC’s future Windows Mobile beast, the Leo, is in the wild! A ninja posted some pictures on the PDAclub.pl forums. This thing is HUGE! It’s running Windows Mobile 6.5 and has a 1Ghz SnapDragon in there too….The lack of ZoomBar and Stylus hints at the presence of a capacitive touch screen.

Source: PDAclub.pl via PDA.pl

Touch Panels prices are dropping fast

This shouldn’t come as a great surprise, Digitimes is reporting that, thanks to fierce competition in the touch panel market these past months, prices of 3.5-inch touch panel modules have dropped to US$9-11 compared to US$16-18 one year ago and the chip prices for the segment has also been reduced to under US$2 from US$4-5. This is obviously good news for all of us.

IC suppliers

Source: Digitimes

Nokia’s X6 uses a Synaptics capacitive touch panel

Nokia-X6

According to Digitimes, Synaptics is the touch panl supplier of Nokia‘s newly announced X6 phone. It’s not know which particular capacitive panel is used. It can be a ClearPad 2000 or the new 10 fingers multi-touch ClearPad 3000 (used on Creative’s Zii EGG)

Synaptics has secured touchscreen solution orders for Nokia’s recently announced X-series handsets, according to market sources. Synaptics is expected to see record shipments of touchscreen ICs and modules in 2009 and remain the top touchscreen IC supplier in 2010 worldwide, the sources added.

Touchscreen handsets will reach a CAGR of more than 20% over the next several years, the sources estimated.

Overseas touchscreen IC suppliers including Synaptics, Cypress, Broadcom and Atmel are targeting the handset segment, while Taiwan-based players Elan Microelectronics, Pixart Imaging, Egalax_empia Technology (EETI), Weltrend Semiconductor, Ene Technology, Integrated Technology Express (ITE) and Holtek Semiconductor are focusing on touchscreen ICs for notebook products.

Source: Digitimes

New Windows Mobile Multi-touch Capacitive screen controller

cypress
Capacitive touch panels are popping up everywhere lately. This time it’s Cypress who is launching the TrueTouch touchscreen controllers compatible with Symbian, Android, Windows Mobile & Windows 7. Here’s the press release:

Cypress Semiconductor Corp. today introduced new, fully-integrated TrueTouch touchscreen controllers, the TMA300 family, based on the PSoC® programmable system-on-chip architecture. The new controllers offer best in
class performance and unique features that are helping to accelerate the development of next-generation differentiated touchscreen-based user interfaces for applications in mobile handsets, portable media players, netbooks, notebooks, printers, digital still cameras, GPS systems and more.

The TMA300 family represents the next generation of multi-touch all-point technology that Cypress pioneered in 2008. The integrated analog sensing engine offers the industry`s fastest and most accurate touchscreen user experience. This responsiveness allows tracking of multiple fingers simultaneously with precise x-y locations and without user delays or problems with erroneous “ghost” responses. The family supports traditional gestures such as tap, double-tap, pan, pinch, scroll, and rotate, and also provides developers a unique platform to create custom gestures without being constrained to two-finger touch.

The TMA300 family will support a range of new features including low-cost 3mm passive stylus input, proximity detection that enables ear/face/palm rejection, water proofing and a “hover” feature that meets the touch requirements of operating systems such as Symbian, Android, Windows Mobile and Windows7. In addition, the new devices offer Cypress`s legendary noise immunity with patented capacitive sensing technology that enables flawless operation in noisy RF and LCD environments.

“Our new multi-touch all-point TrueTouch family has been designed-in to multiple platforms by top-tier manufacturers,” said Chris Seams, executive vice president of Sales and Marketing at Cypress. “Our customers continue to choose TrueTouch for its performance, flexibility and value.”

The devices have been sampling since early 2009 with leading OEMs and have already achieved multiple design wins with volume ramp-ups with leading OEMs already started.

Check a video of the controller here

Source: Cypress via WMPoweruser

Nokia N900 to launch in Ocotober for €500, is Maemo 5 the way to go?

nokia_n900 

Nokia is on a roll this month, there’s no sign of them slowing as they have just officially announced their first Maemo 5 running device, the N900 which is said to be launched in October for €500. This time Nokia didn’t hold back on the CPU power, the N900 is Packing an ARM Cortex-A8 processor (OpenGL ES 2.0) with 1GB of RAM, 32GB of storage space expendable to 46GB with a MicroSD and all the connectivity options you could expect for such a beast (Wifi, BT, GPS etc) is sports a 3.5″ WVGA resistive touch screen, 1320mAh battery, and 5 megapixel camera with Carl Zeiss optics and dual-LED flash. Oh and it also has a slide-out QWERTY keyboard!.
Other than the resistive screen (why the hell didn’t they go for a capacitive panel !?) which in my opinion sucks big time the N900 looks like a winner. Now the most interesting part is that instead of running Symbian S60 it’s the first Nokia phone to have the Maemo 5 linux distro. HOw will this work on a “smartphone” device remains to be seen. The questions is, Is it a good idea to have to different smartphone OSes in your catalog Nokia? What’s up with Symbian ^4 ?
Looking at the videos below the UI does look really slick (doesn’t seem to have V-sync enabled thought)

Source: Nokia via Engadget

HTC patents magnetic stylus for use on capacitive screens

Looks like HTC is hard at work lately. They just filed a patent for what looks like a magnetic stylus which should be able to interact with a capacitive touch panel. It’s kind of ironic givin’ that Microsoft is doing their best to make Windows Mobile 6.5 and Windows Mobile 7 stylus-free. HTC found a solution to the problem by adding a magnetic head to a conductive stylus this enables the stylus the affect the current on the capacitive panel. Here’s the abstract :

An electronic device including a device body and a stylus is provided. The device body has a capacitive touch panel. The stylus has a handle and a head. The head is magnetic. The capacitive touch panel is controlled by the stylus through magnetism of the head.
[...]
To sum up, the head of the stylus of the present application is magnetic. Therefore, when a relative speed exists between the head and the capacitive touch panel, an inducting current is generated on the capacitive touch panel. Then, the capacitive touch panel calculates a position where the inducting current is generated according to the inducting current. Thus, the stylus can control the capacitive touch panel.

HTC stylus

It’s still remains to be seen if this actualy really works..

Head over here to read the whole thing.

Source: WMPoweruser