HTC EVO 4G capped framerate issues

HTC EVO 4G owners have recently reported that the device’s frame rate seems to be capped at 30FPS (can be seen in several benchmark applications) while others are also reporting laggy touch/finger detection in several applications or throughout the OS. HTC has already stated in an official reply that the 30fps was “fixed at the hardware level. It is not an artificial cap”. The hardware is obviously capable of rendering more than 30fps so a couple of XDA users have decided to try to fix this “non-issue”. First off people must understand that the device isn’t broken or anything like that. What is happening here is that the screen V-Sync is enabled and set to 30Hz. What to see more that 30fps? Just disable V-sync and the “problem” will be “fixed” but you will have to suffer from screen tearing. This is apparently what some folks at XDA have done as you can see in the video below (a video recorded at 20fps meant to show the uncapped frame rate is totally useless..but you get to see the frame rate counter hitting 54fps…):

Those who have been able to get this workaround to work are now reporting screen tearing…which is a direct consequence of disabling V-Sync…

The other issue related to the laggy touch input isn’t related to the the framerate issue but is directly affected by the V-Sync lock at 30hz. The touch input driver is probably sampling at 50hzor 60hz but because the screen’s V-Sync is set to 30hz you get this laggy effect which is a problem commonly seen in video games when your GPU is pumping out more that 60fps when your V-Sync is locked at 60hz. This is why disabling V-Sync on the HTC EVO 4G seems to “fix” the problem. HTC will have to find a way to lock the V-Sync (at 60hz?) and keep the touch input sampling rate at 50/60Hz. The few people who managed to apply the “fix” (disabling v-sync) have also fond out that it only works on devices sporting the Epson display not the Novatec (HTC has several LCD suppliers for each handset model).

Source: XDA, XDA,via Pocketnow
  • jmaz

    It looks like HTC has gotten fat and sloppy with its smart phones offerings

    MY experience with the HTC EVO:
    I read and researched all the reviews before the phone came out and they were all great reviews. I visited many of the familiar tech blogs sites such as engadget.com, gizmodo.com, etc. and they all gave the phone more or less stellar reviews. Needless to say, I rushed out and got this phone from RadioSchack. The first thing I noticed was a nagging high pitched static sound on recorded videos and anything recorded with the mike. The videos themselves were highly compressed which made it impossible to watch them on a high def monitor through an HDMI cable. What 720p? I took this phone (first batch, series 0002 ) back to RadioShack and got a new one from the new 003 batch. This one had a different color processing chip that performed worse than the one in the 0002 series. Guess what the same problems with the sound and casing resonance and the video. I took it back, got my money back and closed my Sprint account. They should deliver what they promise.

    I got to thinking, how can a phone maker design and make such a complex communication/entertainment device and do such a poor engineering job where it really counts-the sound. I mean that should be the most important element of any kind of telephone. In the EVO’s case there is some bad engineering going on. For example, the speaker membrane is exposed and poorly secured to the phone. This contributes to the nagging high pitched static sound that I experienced on these two HTC EVO’s. The second bad design element is that the back cover is made of thin hollow plastic which causes the distortion coming out of the speaker to resonate and thus become more noticeable. The sound is distorted, tinny and not clear. If you add to this all the problems that this phone has been having with the SD card, the battery and the 30fps video cap, you might have to consider that this phone is indeed a highly flawed phone as has been claimed by someone out there. Of course, I also fell for the front camera with the mirrored output image, the unusable Qik utility, the YouTube utility that does not work on 3G, and the nonexistent 4G signal, but there is nothing like having a phone that you can use to make clear, undistorted phone calls. It is such a satisfying feeling to be able to make clear telephone calls. The EVO is not made for this. For those of you who must have your EVO no matter what or that have not noticed any of these defects yet, I say to you good luck with your EVO my friend.
    Be careful when you read the crap put out by those overly excited and overly enthused tech bloggers out there in blog land. When they review tech equipment is as if they are getting a brand new toy for the first time so they forget to do any kind of in-depth testing of the devices that they review. This is especially true when they review the new so called smart phones.

  • jmaz

    It looks like HTC has gotten fat and sloppy with its smart phones offerings

    MY experience with the HTC EVO:
    I read and researched all the reviews before the phone came out and they were all great reviews. I visited many of the familiar tech blogs sites such as engadget.com, gizmodo.com, etc. and they all gave the phone more or less stellar reviews. Needless to say, I rushed out and got this phone from RadioSchack. The first thing I noticed was a nagging high pitched static sound on recorded videos and anything recorded with the mike. The videos themselves were highly compressed which made it impossible to watch them on a high def monitor through an HDMI cable. What 720p? I took this phone (first batch, series 0002 ) back to RadioShack and got a new one from the new 003 batch. This one had a different color processing chip that performed worse than the one in the 0002 series. Guess what the same problems with the sound and casing resonance and the video. I took it back, got my money back and closed my Sprint account. They should deliver what they promise.

    I got to thinking, how can a phone maker design and make such a complex communication/entertainment device and do such a poor engineering job where it really counts-the sound. I mean that should be the most important element of any kind of telephone. In the EVO’s case there is some bad engineering going on. For example, the speaker membrane is exposed and poorly secured to the phone. This contributes to the nagging high pitched static sound that I experienced on these two HTC EVO’s. The second bad design element is that the back cover is made of thin hollow plastic which causes the distortion coming out of the speaker to resonate and thus become more noticeable. The sound is distorted, tinny and not clear. If you add to this all the problems that this phone has been having with the SD card, the battery and the 30fps video cap, you might have to consider that this phone is indeed a highly flawed phone as has been claimed by someone out there. Of course, I also fell for the front camera with the mirrored output image, the unusable Qik utility, the YouTube utility that does not work on 3G, and the nonexistent 4G signal, but there is nothing like having a phone that you can use to make clear, undistorted phone calls. It is such a satisfying feeling to be able to make clear telephone calls. The EVO is not made for this. For those of you who must have your EVO no matter what or that have not noticed any of these defects yet, I say to you good luck with your EVO my friend.
    Be careful when you read the crap put out by those overly excited and overly enthused tech bloggers out there in blog land. When they review tech equipment is as if they are getting a brand new toy for the first time so they forget to do any kind of in-depth testing of the devices that they review. This is especially true when they review the new so called smart phones.