Two more Windows Phone 7 Series Hardware Chassis?


According to a couple of Australian Microsoft Developer Evangelist, Microsoft is planing to have 3 Windows Phone 7 hardware chassis. We’ve known about Chassis 1specs for while, thanks to Mary Jo Foley who posted them a couple of months ago, but everybody was still wondering if Redmond was also planning other chassis. If toady’s info turns out to be true, Chassis 2 will be the keyboard variant (with touchscreen) and Chassis 3 the candy bar variant (with touchscreens?).

Source: FranklySpeaking via All About Microsoft

Windows Phone 7 Series sessions at GDC 2010


If you still think that Microsoft isn’t serious about development & gaming on Windows Phone 7 Series then suggest you think again. Just found out that a couple of days before the MIX10 event Microsoft will host several Windows Phone 7 sessions at the Game Developers Conference in San Fransisco (see here):

Developing Games for Windows Phone 7 Series
High Performance 3D Games on Windows Phone 7 Series
Development and Debugging Tools for Windows Phone 7 Series
Bringing the Best of Xbox LIVE to Windows Phone 7 Series

Optimizing Performance of Modern Games for Windows Phone
Speaker: Speaker TBA
Date/Time: Thursday (March 11, 2010) 3:00pm — 4:00pm
Location (room): Room 301, South Hall
Track: Programming
Format: 60-minute Sponsored Session
Experience Level: All

Session Description
The Windows phone development platform supports a wide range of high-performance applications, including detailed rendering in games with high-fidelity content. This talk covers best practices for harnessing the full power of the device, with an emphasis on optimizing graphics in high-end mobile games.

Overview of Game Development for Windows Phone
Speaker: Speaker TBA
Date/Time: Thursday (March 11, 2010) 1:30pm — 2:30pm
Location (room): Room 301, South Hall
Track: Programming
Format: 60-minute Sponsored Session
Experience Level: All

Session Description
The future of Windows phone has never looked better. This talk covers the foundation of Windows phone development, with a look at Windows phone device characteristics, the basic Windows phone development platform, and the business opportunities available through Windows Marketplace for Mobile.

Development and Debugging Tools for Windows Phone
Speaker: Speaker TBA
Date/Time: Thursday (March 11, 2010) 4:30pm — 5:30pm
Location (room): Room 301, South Hall
Track: Programming
Format: 60-minute Sponsored Session
Experience Level: All

Session Description
Developing for mobile platforms has always required special tools and special techniques. This talk covers the core tools available to the Windows phone developer, with an emphasis on building, debugging, and testing high-performance games.

Takeaway

Expanding the Reach of Gaming on Windows phone
Speaker: Speaker TBA
Date/Time: Friday (March 12, 2010) 3:00pm — 4:00pm
Location (room): Room 301, South Hall
Track: Programming
Format: 60-minute Sponsored Session
Experience Level: All

Session Description
A well-designed connection between a mobile game and hosted server through arbitrary web access opens up a whole world of possibility for mobile games. This talk focuses on a basic design for a web-services-enabled game with an eye towards best practices and outlines upcoming Microsoft services that greatly broaden the Windows phone gaming community.

Windows Phone 7 is going to be big.

Motorola Devour Hands-on impressions


The boys at Pocketnow just porsted their first impressions of the newly released Motorola Devour smartphone on Verizon. Even thought I don’t like the overall design of the handset I have to admit that the unibody aluminium shell (like the HTC Legend) looks really nice. Hopefully most of the future handsets will be build this way.

And although the Devour shares a screen and hardware keyboard with the MOTO CLIQ on T-Mobile and the Backflip for AT&T, the Devour feels a lot more solid than the former and the latter hasn’t been released yet, or at least hasn’t been fondled by our editors. There’s no doubt that the Devour is a solid phone. It’s heavy, it feels beastly, and the keyboard, which has raised buttons, feels better to type than the Droid’s squished and flat keys.

Source: Pocketnow