12 pages long HTC HD2 review

gsmarena_001 HD2
GSMArena just posted the final review of the retail HTC HD2. As it’s usualy the case their review is full of picture samples screenshots etc..
Here’s their conclusion:

HTC HD2 has it all to be a winner – groundbreaking hardware, inventive software, high performance and solid design. HTC have struck the right balance with the HD2 and they are certainly giving the competition a run for their money.

Thanks to the capacitive screen the HTC Sense delivers almost unsurpassed Windows Mobile experience complete with multi-touch gestures. It seems the Snapdragon platform is what the now aged Windows Mobile platform was meant to run on. If only we had that kind of hardware and software a couple of years ago, nobody would have even considered the iPhone seriously.

But we didn’t and we don’t suppose Snapdragons are going to become mainstream any time soon. So from a broader perspective, Windows Mobile is still just another runner-up in the run for the ultimate all-touch smartphone. The impressive user-experience on the HD2 is hardly indicative for the OS by itself.

So if you get our drift, it’s not Microsoft, but HTC that deserves the user experience award for the HTC HD2. Their Sense UI and TouchFLO 3D have blended exquisitely well delivering an unmatched social networking integration (save perhaps for the HTC Hero) and touch experience easily equaling that of the iPhone.

But even though it’s such a powerful package, the HD2 has it flaws too. The camera is below par, video recording is kinda poor, the limited internal storage is a real bugger and the its sheer size does push the limits of user comfort. That last thing will perhaps be a deal breaker for many users.

What is more, the HD2, just like its predecessor, does not justify its HD moniker. It doesn’t capture HD videos (but we knew that beforehand) and worse yet, it cannot even play any right. Samsung Omnia HD does these things with a substantially lower clocked CPU, so we guess Snapdragon doesn’t equal HD automatically either.

But still Snapdragons are still quite rare on the phone market and until more of those appear next year, the Toshiba TG01 and the Acer neoTouch will always remain two opponents the HD2 should consider. Both of them feature less UI customizations, resistive touchscreens and less RAM. But what works in their favor is they both are nearly 200 euro cheaper than the HD2 with its 550 euro price tag. That alone makes them worth checking out. But as we said, HTC have done a tremendous job of making Windows Mobile more usable and the added value of their product is well worth the extra bucks.

Looks like the boys at GSMArena didn’t get the memo about CorePlayer not supporting hardware acceleration on HTC devices (only Overlay support). They should have tried to play a wmv-hd trailer in the default HTC Album or WMP (they support HW accell for MP4 & WMV files) to see if it plays smoothly.
The camera does look bad though. As we have seen earlier the purple-tint/spot is still present. Major fail on HTC’s part here IMO.

Source: GSMAerna via WMPoweruser